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Archive for December 5th, 2008

 

I love the bowls of candy present during the holidays.

I love the bowls of candy present during the holidays.

Earlier this week new set of bulletin boards appeared near the physics study room at UCSB (where I happen to spend a lot of time). One of these is dedicated to research opportunities to help undergraduates find professors to work for. Since I did not have such an easy conglomeration of information I had to find out the hard (well harder) way.

So you want to get involved in undergraduate research? The two main types of research (for sciences at least) are working for a professor at your university and summer internships (Research Experience for Undergraduates: REU’s).

It is easier to get work at your own university since there is no application process involved, there tends to be no or little pay as well. To find a position at your university it is best to think of what you want to do. The internet is one of the best tools here. Start by going to the department website and find the section for research. Usually the websites are divided into academics, research and maybe outreach. Once in the research sections look at everything available and make not of what interests you.

Based on the list of interesting items find three to four professors with interesting sounding research and maybe a good website. If a website is not listed for the professor try googling their name to find it, oftentimes it is not listed on the departments website or it could be under another departments. Read what they have on their websites and maybe a recent publication to become familiar with the type of research they are doing. This exercise will also help you decide what you actually find interesting, if reading the websites and papers (at least the website) is boring try looking at other types of research.

Once you find three or four professors with interesting research go talk to them. If you have a class with one of them ask them about their research after class or during their office hours. If you have never had a class with them see about finding when their office hours are and go visit them then. You want to do a bit of research on their research first so you can ask relevant questions and show that you are serious about doing research. If you have never met them before or do not feel comfortable showing up randomly e-mail them. Here is an example of such an e-mail, most is specific to my circumstances but it gives a general (I sent it in June) :

Dear Professor [Name],

As you know, in order to secure a graduate school position as a physics student I need hands on research experience. While I was studying abroad in Edinburgh last year I applied to many summer research positions including NSF REUs such as University of Washington and Caltech, as well as NASA’s summer research program. Unfortunately there were not enough research opportunities for me to get one.

Since the research is necessary for me to continue my career in physics I am asking if you have research opportunities in your lab starting this Fall quarter.

I understand that you are currently working on [research].

My field of interest is currently [similar and related interests to what they are doing, that is why you are asking them].

However, I would be happy to take advantage of any opportunity you may have. If there are no positions currently available in your lab, are you aware of any other opening available for me.

I would like to talk with you about any research opportunities in your lab, or any advice you may have.

I am looking forward to hearing from you, I will contact you for follow up in the first week in August.

Sincerely,

Michael Hutchins

[Contact Info]

That should give some ideas as what too write if you need any.

Aside from getting research opportunities at your home universities there are also REU programs and other internships such as NASA USRP. These are eight to ten week paid programs where you learn to do research under a professor and occasionally get published. The applications tend to be due in December or January depending on the program. Most are highly competitive so do not be discouraged if you do not get in (I didn’t  make it in one). As I have not done one I do not really know what they are about but they look really nice. Especially the part where you get paid.

I should also mention that working for a professor at your home University can either be for units/credits or pay. Sometimes both if you get a stipend and a research grant. Though it only works out to be about ¢70 an hour.

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