Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘macbook pro’

Uptime

This is the best uptime I have seen of any computer I have accessed.

This is the best uptime I have seen of any computer I have accessed.

The best uptime I have personal achieved was on my old Powerbook G4 with an uptime of 100 days when running 10.4. I have yet to be able to come anywhere near matching that uptime with either 10.5 or 10.6 (which has not broken ten days). Since I can now dual boot into Windows I will probably not be able to achieve a high uptime on my laptop. Even without the Windows partition I still have some issues to work out before I get it to be super stable.

The pictured uptime is from a computer in my lab, I just happened to check out uptime yesterday when it hit 500 days up. This particular one has a UPS and its own generator, it’s internet connection is also on a generator and UPS, so long as Seattle as a whole does not go on it will keep on going.

As for my laptop a few issues persist through 10.6. When I am running on my dedicated graphics card (instead of the integrated one) the system hangs for around twenty seconds every hour or so (so being ± 40 minutes). I think this is related to the 1.7 firmware update but I don’t know how comfortable I would be in downgrading the firmware. Especially since I think this computer shipped with 1.7 on it. The system also occasionally starts acting really weird requiring a logout. The last issue is that when I wake it from sleep some windows are blacked out for up to ten seconds before refreshing back to normal.

I might just need to do an erase and install with 10.6 instead of my current upgraded install. I don’t because my Microsoft Office and CS4 disks are in California while I am not. Add to those reinstalling Matlab (and Mathematica) and it is enough of a deterrent to reinstalling the OS, though I really should.

Read Full Post »

Bill's Bus taking friendly Isla Vistans to downtown Santa Barbara.

Bill's Bus taking friendly Isla Vistans to downtown Santa Barbara.

The new MacBook Pro’s (and mine) have Mini DisplayPort outputs instead of a standard such as DVI or VGA. My Powerbook had DVI so I was hoping that the Mini DisplayPort to DVI connector would allow me to use my current DVI to VGA connector.

No such luck, one has a – surrounded by four short pins while the other has just the -. I thought about simply removing those pins, except that three of those are the R, G and B channels of the VGA display. Namely three of the five important pins in a VGA display (the others being VSYNC and HSYNC).

After looking into it there are three DVI types, A, D and I. So much for simplicity, looks like I am getting another adapter.

Read Full Post »

As I leave UCSB I depart with my trusty Powerbook.

As I leave UCSB I depart with my trusty Powerbook.

Today I leave my trusty Powerbook G4 for a new MacBook Pro. As part of my graduation gift I need to set up my Powerbook for my Brother and trust that he will take as good care of it as I have.

It is an oddly sentimental parting, I know that the Powerbook will remain in the family, in fact I can see it every day.

And yet…

It is traveled the world with me, spent four years of college and I have changed so much since I received it after my high school graduation four years ago.

This is also the first time I am not migrating my hard drive I have been migrating, upgrading or archive and installing all of my computers since OS X was initially released. So simply moving my files over and reinstalling the applications seems like a fresh start in a way, yet at the same time it feels like I am losing something.

I will miss the stubborn latch, the custom feet made of painters tape, the noisy DVD drive and all of the dents and dings that I felt personally when the computer received them. I have become so used to the hardware that using the new MacBook Pro makes me feel slightly fumbling and awkward.

Now I need to move forward, embrace my new laptop and customize it so it feel like mine again.

Read Full Post »

 

The entrance to the UCSB dorm Manzanita Village

The entrance to the UCSB dorm Manzanita Village

Apple released a new set of laptops today. And of course I want one of the new ones since mine (Powerbook G4) is getting a bit slow, especially when trying to process 10mb RAW image files. Aside from that one speed aspect and the lack of an intel processor I am still happy with my laptop.

There are few things about the new ones that really stood out too me.

The glossy screen. Before there was the option to have a matte finish, which I prefer only because that is what I currently have. I have read a lot of negative opinions about how glossy has terrible reflections compared to matte. Usually the same people also say how much better CRTs are compared to LCD. What has amused me is that CRTs are quite glossy, I guess the argument is valid when using a laptop outside.

The other (negative) changes are in the keyboard. Some decry the recessed keyboard versus the traditional powerbook style keyboards, that does not really bother me. What does is the loss of the fn enabled numpad as well as the enter key (it used to be between the Apple key and the keypad). I know I could use fn+return but for programs like Mathematica enter is the main key used in running processes.

The new design looks interesting and I do like the all glass screen, or at least I liked it on the iMacs I have seen. The other new feature that might have some useful functionality is the presence of two video cards: one integrated and another discrete. I have always been a proponent of the separate graphics cards for those that need them and having both, according to Apple, will help save on battery life. Anything would be better then my one hour battery I currently have. I would like to see if anyone finds a way to combine or run both for better graphics processing.

In short I want a new Macbook Pro. Of course I won’t be getting one. Though I might possibly have the chance of buying or receiving one if and or when I am accepted or attend graduate school. Ideally by then the new laptops will have a refresh on them to sort out the inevitable first generation issues.

Read Full Post »